Multiple Margins: Unpacking Inequalities in Eastern Indonesia

This panel takes up the conference theme of inequality in the context of eastern Indonesia, with particular attention given to West Papua. We take inequality not only as economic disparity or uneven access to resources, but inequality, as well, in the uneven circulation of discourse, mobility of populations, and distribution of violence (in its many forms). We, further, understand inequality as contingent on geopolitical space and take up questions around the construction of disparity itself. How might, for example, the irregular application of law or the flexibility of ‘legality’ become instruments for (re)producing inequality? How do forms of media or bureaucratic techniques of documentation – in both private and public sectors – reproduce or subvert existing inequalities? Or, how do current health disparities shape present and future imaginaries of equality (or inequality)? While international agendas and national policies are inextricable from the politics of West Papua (and eastern Indonesia, more broadly), this panel is attentive to both the relationship of West Papua to a central Indonesian government, as well as the politics that often drop out of the singular narrative of Papua as merely a product of central coercion and exploitation. Ultimately, we ask: What kind of politics are stimulated, hindered, or disallowed by the contingent inequalities of eastern Indonesia?

Panel Coordinator:

Clare Cameron (UC San Francisco/UC Berkeley)
Tony Rudyansjah (Universitas Indonesia)

Presenters:

  1. Inequality, Inclusion and the Politics of Memory in Ambon, Indonesia [Timo Kaartinen]
  2. Localizing Timor and the Dicisions of Modern Sovereignty [Dylan Fagan]
  3. Commodity Supplies, Gift Exchange and War Memories among the Butonese in the Moluccas Province [Hatib Kadir]
  4. Relasi Pertukaran (Exchange): Dalam lingkup Sosial-Kekerabatan, Ekonomi, Politik dan Religi Pada Orang Kayo Pulau dan Kelompok Etnis Lainnya di Kota Jayapura Provinsi Papua [Hanro Yonathan Lekitoo]
  5. The Sociality of Humanity and Globalization in Two Villages of Eastern Indonesia [Tony Rudyansjah]
  6. A Just Arena of Negotiating Identities during Social Change Processes. A Possible Pathway? [Yulia Sugandi]
  7. Edge Effects: Salt-Making Landscape of Indonesian Timor [Gillian Bogart]
  8. The Corals and the Climate in Eastern Indonesia [Joseph Klein]
  9. Seksualitas Papua: Antara Adat dan Global [Djekky Djoht Morin]
  10. Di bawah Bayang-Bayang Kekuasaan: Membongkar Dominasi Kultural Kesultanan Buton di Kulisusu [Nurlin]
  11. Politik Identitas Kelompok Minoritas: Studi tentang Strategi Survival  Agama Noaulu di Negeri Sepa Maluku Tengah [Abdul Manaf Tubaka]
  12. Decentralization and the Reinvention of the Papuan Self: The Politics of Place and Belonging in Eastern Indonesia [Michael Surret]
  13. Historisitas Rasulullah SAW: Memahami Keterpaduan Islam dalam Prinsip Relasi Kaum Alawiyyin di Kepulauan Maluku [Ikhtiar Hatta]

 

6th International Symposium of Journal Antropologi Indonesia, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, 26th-28th July 2016 Copy

Post-Reformasi Indonesia: 
The challenges of social inequalities and inclusion 

Since Reformasi began in 1998, Indonesia has experienced tremendous political, economic, social, and cultural transformations. The nation has made significant progress in building a more democratic polity. The general election in 2014 was an important turning point. The newly elected president, Joko Widodo (widely known as Jokowi), is the first with no ties to the Suharto regime which many people take as a positive sign of change.

When we organized the first Symposium of Jurnal Antropologi Indonesia in 2000, we were optimistic that Reformasi would improve the lives of Indonesians everywhere. In particular, we believed that greater political equality and increased multiculturalism would lead to greater social and economic equality. However Indonesia is experiencing rising income gaps, conflicts over access to resources and jobs, increasing religious intolerance, and continued marginalization of groups and individuals. Some scholars predict that these problems will continue because reformasi alone could not address the root causes of inequality.

For the 6th International Symposium of the Journal of Anthropology Indonesia, we invite Indonesian and foreign scholars to propose panels and papers to discuss pressing issues associated with inequality. The objective of the symposium is to explore the social, political-economic, and cultural dimensions of these inequalities, their underlying causes, and the challenges of addressing them. We seek contributions that critically analyze various forms and processes producing inequalities, including government and non- government initiatives and interventions meant to address these problems.

The following are some key questions we hope participants will address.

1. In what ways are ethnic, gender, and other forms of social difference linked to inequality?
2. In what ways might corruption contribute to current patterns of inequality?
3. How are socio-economic inequalities exacerbated by social and political responses to environmental factors? ( for example, preventing and addressing environmental disasters, climate change, pollution, or regional differences in resource endowments.)
4. In what ways do people resist and find ways to overcome the inequalities that they experience in daily life?
5. In what ways are processes of inequality being shaped by International agendas and national policies (for example ASEAN Free trade, global investment, international development agenda)?

 

6th International Symposium of Journal Antropologi Indonesia, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, 26th-28th July 2016

Post-Reformasi Indonesia: 
The challenges of social inequalities and inclusion 

Since Reformasi began in 1998, Indonesia has experienced tremendous political, economic, social, and cultural transformations. The nation has made significant progress in building a more democratic polity. The general election in 2014 was an important turning point. The newly elected president, Joko Widodo (widely known as Jokowi), is the first with no ties to the Suharto regime which many people take as a positive sign of change.

When we organized the first Symposium of Jurnal Antropologi Indonesia in 2000, we were optimistic that Reformasi would improve the lives of Indonesians everywhere. In particular, we believed that greater political equality and increased multiculturalism would lead to greater social and economic equality. However Indonesia is experiencing rising income gaps, conflicts over access to resources and jobs, increasing religious intolerance, and continued marginalization of groups and individuals. Some scholars predict that these problems will continue because reformasi alone could not address the root causes of inequality.

For the 6th International Symposium of the Journal of Anthropology Indonesia, we invite Indonesian and foreign scholars to propose panels and papers to discuss pressing issues associated with inequality. The objective of the symposium is to explore the social, political-economic, and cultural dimensions of these inequalities, their underlying causes, and the challenges of addressing them. We seek contributions that critically analyze various forms and processes producing inequalities, including government and non- government initiatives and interventions meant to address these problems.

The following are some key questions we hope participants will address.

1. In what ways are ethnic, gender, and other forms of social difference linked to inequality?
2. In what ways might corruption contribute to current patterns of inequality?
3. How are socio-economic inequalities exacerbated by social and political responses to environmental factors? ( for example, preventing and addressing environmental disasters, climate change, pollution, or regional differences in resource endowments.)
4. In what ways do people resist and find ways to overcome the inequalities that they experience in daily life?
5. In what ways are processes of inequality being shaped by International agendas and national policies (for example ASEAN Free trade, global investment, international development agenda)?